APRIL 27, 2017

 

CHANNEL DEEPING/DREDGING

Port of Skagit changing marina dredging process

Kimberly Cauvel, April 27, 2017, GoSkagit.com

The Port of Skagit has received permission to change the way it dredges the La Conner Marina.

The state Department of Ecology approved the port’s request to use hydraulic dredging and dispose of the sediment at a site in Rosario Strait, off the shores of Anacortes.

Read more here:  http://www.goskagit.com/news/port-of-skagit-changing-marina-dredging-process/article_73dcbab0-b18c-52bc-8684-8f45995d5806.html

 

 

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

NWSA container volumes jump 14% in March

Kate Martin, April 24, 2017, The News Tribune

The Northwest Seaport Alliance, a partnership between the Puget Sound ports of Tacoma and Seattle, said year-to-date container volumes were up 10 percent compared with the previous year.

In a news release, the alliance said international volumes recorded the highest first quarter since 2005.

The alliance moved 351,607 TEUs, or 20-foot equivalent containers, in January, February and March in full imports.

Read more here:  http://www.thenewstribune.com/news/business/article146458869.html

 

 

ENVIRONMENT/NATURAL RESOURCES

Environmental group says it plans to sue Port of Olympia for Clean Water Act violations

Rolf Boone, April 24, 2017, The Olympian

An environmental group with ties to Olympia says it will sue the Port of Olympia for alleged violations of the Clean Water Act if the group and port can’t come to an agreement in the next 60 days.

Waste Action Project of Covington, working with a Seattle law firm, sent a letter to the port earlier this month outlining concerns and allegations about the port’s marine terminal.

“The Port of Olympia has violated and continues to violate the Clean Water Act and the terms and conditions of (two stormwater permits) with respect to operations of, and discharges of stormwater and pollutants, including unpermitted discharges,” the letter reads.

Read more here:  http://www.theolympian.com/news/business/article146501624.html

 

 

LAND USE

Port of Benton looking forward to “Vintner’s Village II” groundbreaking

Kristina Shalhoup, April 24, 2017, NBC Right Now

It’s no secret that our local wineries are a huge boost for tourism, especially for cities like Prosser. And it looks like Prosser is well on its way to getting an attractive new addition, thanks to the Port of Benton.

Reporter Kristina Shalhoup talked with the Port’s Executive Director today, and learned that with Vintner’s Village being so successful, the Port of Benton is getting ready to break ground on what they’re calling “Vintner’s Village II”.

They’ll kick start the project with a $2 million development building on the land. That first building will contain three 2,500 square-foot bays, including an office area, manufacturing, and maybe some wine making or brewery space. On top of that, there will be another 1,500 square-feet for the Prosser Economics Development Association to work out of.

Read more here:  http://www.nbcrightnow.com/story/35232722/port-of-benton-looking-forward-to-vintners-village-ii-groundbreaking

 

 

PEOPLE

Port of Olympia finance director says he will retire May 31

Rolf Boone, April 25, 2017, The Olympian

Finance director and auditor Jeff Smith, who worked for the Port of Olympia for about five years, says he will retire from the port and a career spent with port districts on May 31.

Smith joined the port in February 2012. Before that, he spent five years at the Port of Vancouver USA and 24 years at the Port of Tacoma.

Smith had to make a finance-related presentation Monday night to the commission, so the commission took a portion of that time to share a few thoughts about their finance director.

Read more here:  http://www.theolympian.com/news/business/article146548489.html

 

 

Chelan County Commissioner honored preservation work

Kevin Rounce, April 27, 2017, KPQ.com

Port of Chelan County Commissioner Rory Turner has spent years as a private developer reviving historic buildings throughout Washington State. Along the way, he continues to be recognized for his great work revitalizing these buildings.

This week Mr. Turner received The Valerie Sivinski Award from the WA State Historic Preservation Office for Outstanding Historic Building Rehabilitation for his work on the 1923 Elks Building in downtown Ellensburg, WA. After years of neglect and disrepair, Mr. Turner focused his development and building rehabilitation expertise on bringing the building back to prominence and multi-functional use. The Ellensburg Elks Building now has two restaurants, office space for commercial use and non-profit organizations, and a restored lodge room for use as an event center.

This Award is not the first award Turner has received for rehabilitating downtown spaces. In 2016, Turner received the Excellence on Main Award from the WA State Main Street Program for the Ellensburg Elks Building as well as Turner’s work in the Wenatchee Downtown. Wenatchee buildings rehabilitated and preserved for their historic structure and story include the Exchange Building, Wenatchee Hotel and the Dore Building.

Read more here:  http://kpq.com/chelan-county-commissioner-honored-preservation-work/

 

 

TRANSPORTATION

Traffic jam at the Nation’s crossroads

Will Connors, April 25, 2017, Wall Street Journal

This city’s most famous poet, Carl Sandburg, called Chicago the “nation’s freight handler.” That title stands true today.

Every day, some 300,000 commuters on two dozen passenger train lines converge in Chicago, where they share limited real estate with six major railroad lines and 30,000 to 50,000 freight cars, or roughly 25% of the country’s freight rail traffic.

Chicago is the country’s No. 1 hub for freight traffic and No. 2 for commuter train lines—and its problems can bog down the whole system. Over the years, the city’s densely populated neighborhoods, grinding local politics and a host of infrastructure issues have kept trains from running on time. Road traffic and shared rail lines between commuter and freight systems have created the worst rail backlogs in the country. In 2003, it could take trains as long as 43 hours to crawl through Chicago, in some cases at five miles an hour.

Read more here:  https://www.wsj.com/articles/traffic-jam-at-the-nations-crossroads-1493126761

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