AUGUST 6, 2015

ELECTIONS/GOVERNANCE 

Bobby Briscoe, Joan Lotze pull ahead in primaries

August 5, 2015, The Northern Light

Bobby Briscoe will face off against Ferndale mayor Gary Jensen in the race for Port of Bellingham commissioner.

As of 8 p.m. on August 4, Briscoe, a Blaine resident and fisherman for more than 40 years, won 44 percent of the vote. Jensen took 39 percent, while Ferndale businessman Lloyd Zimmerman trailed with 17 percent. Briscoe and Jensen will now compete for the seat on the commission, which is currently occupied by Blaine resident Jim Jorgensen.

Read more: http://www.thenorthernlight.com/2015/08/05/bobby-briscoe-joan-lotze-pull-ahead-in-primaries/

 

 

Beauvais takes top votes for Port of Port Angeles race; Breidenback holds slim lead over Whetham

By James Casey, August 6, 2015, Peninsula Daily News

Connie Beauvais of Joyce was the top vote-getter in initial primary election returns for the Port of Port Angeles District 3 seat, while Michael Breidenbach of Forks was edging out Lee Whetham of Port Angeles as her opponent in the November general election.

Beauvais, 63, won 615 votes, or 32.71 percent, while Breidenbach, 63, had 461 votes, or 24.52 percent and Whetham, 55, had 430 votes, or 22.87 percent.

Read more: http://www.peninsuladailynews.com/article/20150805/NEWS/308059977/beauvais-takes-top-votes-for-port-of-port-angeles-race-breidenback

 

 

MARINE TERMINALS 

Port releases new oil terminal lease details

By Aaron Corvin, August 6, 2015, The Columbian

A mostly unredacted lease for a rail-to-marine oil transfer terminal at the Port of Vancouver, released today as part of a legal settlement, hands critics of the port’s lack of transparency a victory, raises fresh questions about the port’s decision to scrub parts of the contract and arrives during an election year that will install a new commissioner on the port’s three-member board.

The disclosures reveal several pieces of new information, including that Tesoro Corp., a petroleum refiner, and Savage Cos., a transportation company, could expand or build a second oil-by-rail facility if they exceed handling an average 400,000 barrels of crude with the first terminal.

Read more: http://www.columbian.com/news/2015/aug/06/port-releases-new-oil-terminal-lease-detalis/

 

 

PEOPLE 

Late Port of C-W commissioner’s devotion praised

By Aaron Corvin, August 5, 2015, The Columbian

The death of Port of Camas-Washougal Commissioner Mark Lampton has triggered a process to appoint his successor within 90 days. The process launches as the port’s executive director on Wednesday spoke of Lampton as a boss, friend and champion of economic development.

Lampton, 69, who died of cancer Monday morning, was a mentor, said David Ripp, the port’s executive director. “I’m going to miss him dearly.”

The port said in a news release that it will celebrate and honor Lampton’s life during a gathering to be held at 10:30 a.m. Friday, Aug. 21, at one of his favorite parks: Chinook Plaza in Parker’s Landing Historical Park, 24 S. A St. in Washougal.

Read more: http://www.columbian.com/news/2015/aug/05/late-port-c-w-commissioner-devotion-lampton/

 

 

TRADE 

West Coast Ports Regain Some Lost Share of Container Imports

By Erica E. Phillips, August 5, 2015, Wall Street Journal

U.S. West Coast ports are regaining some of the share of import supply chains that they lost during recent labor strife at the nation’s largest gateways.

Their share of container imports—measured in the dollar value of goods—rose to 47.1% in June, up from 45% in April and May, according to data released Wednesday by the U.S. Census Bureau.

Read more: http://www.wsj.com/articles/west-coast-ports-regain-some-lost-share-of-container-imports-1438805273

 

Supersized Cargo Skips Small Ports

By Erica E. Phillips, August 3, 2015, Wall Street Journal

As the scale of global trade gets bigger, many small and midsize U.S. ports, such as the Port of Portland, face the prospect of falling off the map entirely.

Barges loaded with Idaho-grown peas and lentils until this spring regularly chugged downriver to Portland’s port, the first leg in a journey that would end in supermarkets and restaurants across Asia and Europe.

Read more: http://www.wsj.com/articles/supersized-cargo-skips-small-ports-1438646853

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