MARCH 1, 2016

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 

Port of Ridgefield plans to ‘light up’ Discovery Corridor

February 26, 2016, Vancouver Business Journal

Nelson Holmberg, vice president of innovation for the Port of Ridgefield has a vision.

“We want to light up the whole Discovery Corridor with data capacity. This will attract advanced manufacturing, software companies, healthcare companies – they’ll all want to come to Ridgefield,” said Holmberg.

Read more here: http://www.vbjusa.com/news/top-stories/port-of-ridgefield-plans-to-light-up-discovery-corridor/

 

Port of Pasco may sell crane, end container business

Wendy Culverwell, February 28, 2016, Tri-City Herald

A big, red Pasco landmark could soon become a victim of falling demand for container barging on the Columbia River.

The Port of Pasco is poised to sell a crane that it hasn’t used in five years, acknowledging its container barge business is all but dead and unlikely to return. Randy Hayden, the port’s executive director, reluctantly recommended Thursday that the port sell its Manitowoc 4100. The port commission discussed the state of marine affairs but made no decisions.

Read more here: http://www.tri-cityherald.com/news/local/article63097317.html#storylink=cpy

 

 

LABOR 

ILWU, PMA open door to contract extension

Bill Mongelluzzo, March 1, 2016, JOC.com

For the first time since the grueling contract negotiations of 2014-15, the presidents of the International Longshore and Warehouse Union and the Pacific Maritime Association said they are willing to raise with their memberships the possibility of extending the existing agreement beyond the July 1, 2019, expiration date in the interests of labor peace.

Read more here: http://www.joc.com/maritime-news/labor/ilwu-pma-open-door-contract-extension_20160301.html?utm_source=email&utm_medium=content&utm_campaign=TPM2016&mgs1=db35miHhc1

 

TRADE 

What the largest container ship to visit Seattle means to the region

By Mike Moore, February 29, 2016, Special to The Times

ON Monday, the Port of Seattle greeted the largest container vessel ever to call on Washington state. The Benjamin Franklin is capable of carrying 18,000 20-foot equivalent units of containers. Laid end to end, the containers would stretch 68 miles from Tacoma to Everett. The vessel itself is longer than two Space Needles.

While the vessel is impressive, it also signals a sea change in the shipping industry — a change that is already reverberating up and down the West Coast, Canada, the Gulf of Mexico and the East Coast. Simply put, vessels are getting larger, shipping companies are consolidating through mergers, acquisitions, and vessel-sharing agreements. And they are looking for gateways to the Midwest and East Coast from Asia that provide for cost savings and maximum efficiencies.

Read more here: http://www.seattletimes.com/opinion/what-the-largest-container-ship-to-visit-seattle-means-to-the-region/

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