NOVEMBER 9, 2016

 

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

Seaport Alliance scores gains despite trade slowdown

Jon Talton, November 8, 2016, The Seattle Times

The September numbers are in for West Coast ports and the outlier is the Northwest Seaport Alliance, the combined seaport operations of the Port of Seattle and Port of Tacoma. And that’s a good thing.

While other ports are struggling from the global slowdown, punctuated by the bankruptcy filing of Hanjin Shipping, the Puget Sound container ports are clawing back regional market share from Canadian rivals.

Total laden cargo volume jumped 12.1 percent in September compared with the same month a year ago, according to a report in the Journal of Commerce (registration is required). Year to date, the gain is 5.4 percent year over year. That compares with a gain of 2.2 percent for all U.S. West Coast ports.

Read more here:  http://www.seattletimes.com/business/economy/seaport-alliance-scores-gains-despite-trade-slowdown/

 

 

LAND USE

‘Friends’ celebrate Chinook’s ‘new’ old school

Luke Whittaker, November 8, 2016, Chinook Observer

A former derelict classroom building is the center of renewed optimism in Chinook.

The Chinook School, a 1920s era structure that was largely forgotten from the 1970s until a renovation campaign began in 2000, is the focus of the Friends of Chinook School nonprofit group. The makeover hit another milestone late this October with the opening of a new visitor center operating within the central office of the former school. A new roof, foundation, windows and refinished wood highlight what has been a time of transition for the former school, toward a role as a community convention center.

“It ceased being a school building in the early ‘70s,” Friends of Chinook School Vice President Loma Billups said. “And kids were no longer going there because no one had maintained it — there were just too many problems.” For nearly two decades, the building sat idle waiting for a new purpose until the Friends group rallied around a remodel.

Read more here:  http://www.chinookobserver.com/co/local-news/20161108/friends-celebrate-chinooks-new-old-school

 

 

Group:  Seattle Arena won’t be simple accomplishment

Kate Martin, November 2016, Athletic Business (copyright 2016 Spokane Spokesman-Review)

At the start of a daylong retreat Friday, members of the Northwest Seaport Alliance talked about the entity’s accomplishments in its first year.

For Port of Seattle Commissioner Fred Felleman, persuading the Seattle City Council to defeat the proposed vacation of a south downtown Seattle road for a new sports arena was a highlight.

“The real accomplishment was to see us rally around the arena issue,” Felleman said of alliance members. “It showed the collective clout of the alliance. It was a home port (issue for the Port of Seattle), but it was clearly a seaport concern.”

Read more here:  http://www.athleticbusiness.com/stadium-arena/group-says-new-seattle-arena-won-t-be-simple-accomplishment.html

 

 

Downtown Olympia developer to move forward with new project on port property

Rolf Boone, November 7, 2016, The Olympian

Prominent downtown Olympia developer Walker John is ready to move forward with a new project that would occupy Port of Olympia-owned land in the heart of the city.

John, who redeveloped a former state office building into the Thurston First Bank Building at Franklin Street and Legion Way, wants to bring three buildings to a corner parcel at Jefferson Street and State Avenue. The project would be home to 87 market-rate apartments, nine townhome-style units — similar to the townhomes that John has built at 12th Avenue and Jefferson Street — and 8,500 square feet of retail space.

“We’ve heard loud and clear that the city wants more living density downtown,” said Mike Reid, senior manager of business development for the port.

Read more here:  http://www.theolympian.com/news/business/article113177928.html

 

MARINE TERMINALS

Shipping industry in crisis:  Los Angeles and Long Beach ports on uncertain ground

Rachel Uranga, November 5, 2016, Long Beach Press Telegram

With analysts estimating that oceangoing shippers could lose up to $10 billion worldwide this year, the industry that made globalization possible is sinking into crisis.

To survive, shippers are merging, signing swiftly assembled alliances and slashing costs.

The pain isn’t felt on foreign shores alone. Los Angeles and Long Beach, home to the nation’s busiest port complex, are fighting for an increasingly smaller piece of a shrinking shipping market.

Read more here:  http://www.presstelegram.com/business/20161105/shipping-industry-in-crisis-los-angeles-and-long-beach-ports-on-uncertain-ground

 

PEOPLE

Chelan Port consultant could become director

Christine Pratt, November 9, 2016, Wenatchee World

The man hired to help the Port of Chelan County find a replacement for its soon-to-retire executive director could end up becoming that executive director, but only for about two years.

Port commissioners Monday will vote on a proposed contract to hire consultant Patrick Jones of Seattle-based Jones Strategic.

The contract will include obligations for Jones to direct the port, help port commissioners create a new strategic plan and then help recruit a permanent executive director, JC Baldwin, . . .

Read more here:  http://www.wenatcheeworld.com/news/2016/nov/09/chelan-port-consultant-could-become-director/

 

 

Patrick Jones to replace Chelan Port’s Urdahl as Executive

Steve Hair, November 7, 2016, NCW Life Channel

Former Moses Lake Port District Executive Director Patrick Jones is expected to be named Executive Director for the Port of Chelan County.  Jones would replace Mark Urdahl who is retiring at the end of the year. Urdahl says the Board of Commissioners authorized President JC Baldwin to negotiate an agreement with Jones to serve as the Port’s executive director for a period of up to two years, beginning January 1, 2017.

Jones had been serving as the Port’s consultant charged with the recruitment of the next executive director.  Urdahl says a number of qualified applications were received in that recruitment process; however, the Commission decided to take a step back from selecting a permanent director and will use Jones to guide them through a process of evaluating existing strategies and activities with the goal of creating a new vision and potentially new roles for the Port of Chelan County.

Its reported that Jones has a wealth of port industry experience, having worked for the Port of Seattle, serving as the executive director of the Washington Public Ports Association, and most recently, as executive director of the Port of Moses Lake, where his leadership resulted in a significant expansion of that community’s industrial base.

Read more here:  http://www.ncwlife.com/patrick-jones-replace-chelan-ports-urdahl-exec/

 

 

Port of Chelan County names temporary executive director

November 8, 2016, KOZI Community Radio

At the regular business meeting of November 3, 2016, the Board of Commissioners of the Port of Chelan County authorized Port Commission President JC Baldwin to negotiate an agreement with Patrick Jones to serve as the Port’s executive director for a period of up to two years, beginning January 1, 2017. Mr. Jones had been serving (in his capacity as a principle in Jones Strategic) as the consultant charged with the recruitment of the next executive director. The executive director position will become vacant at the end of 2016 with the retirement of long time executive director Mark Urdahl.

Read more here: http://kozi.com/port-of-chelan-county-names-temporary-executive-director/

 

TRANSPORTATION

Washington State Route 281 from Quincy to George designated as a critical rural freight corridor

AJOT, November 7, 2016, American Journal of Transportation

Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT) and Federal Highway Administration have recently designated Washington State Route (SR) 281 as a “Critical Rural Freight Corridor.” SR 281 is located within the boundaries of the Port of Quincy, and runs for approximately 10 miles between Interstate 90 (I-90) at George, Washington and State Route 28 at Quincy, Washington. This important designation of SR 281 as a Critical Rural Freight Corridor puts SR 281 in strong consideration or on a higher priority to be widened to four lanes (from George to Quincy).

There are several reasons for the designation of SR 281 as a Critical Rural Freight Corridor. SR 281 is a high volume “T-2” truck corridor, and in 2015, nearly 8 million tons of cargo traveled on it. In particular, a large volume of truck traffic on SR 281 comes from the Wenatchee and Chelan areas on SR 28 via SR 281 to I-90. The Wenatchee and Chelan areas are among the largest fruit packing areas in the world. Additionally, a great deal of truck traffic comes directly from Quincy, as there are several food processors (frozen French fries, frozen vegetables, etc.), fresh produce packers (apples, potatoes, onions, etc.), and nearly 1 million square feet of cold storage warehousing in Quincy, which stores many of the above mentioned products that are mostly transported from Quincy on SR 281 to I-90, destined for export from the Ports of Seattle and Tacoma, or for Midwest or East Coast domestic markets.

Read more here:  https://www.ajot.com/news/washington-state-route-281-from-quincy-to-george-designated-as-a-critical-r

 

 

SR 281 designation may lead to changes

John Summers, November 8, 2016, 560KPQ Newsradio

Washington State Department of Transportation and Federal Highway Administration have recently designated Washington State Route 281 as a “Critical Rural Freight Corridor.” SR 281 is located within the boundaries of the Port of Quincy, and runs for approximately 10 miles between Interstate 90 at George and State Route 28 at Quincy.

This designation puts SR 281 in strong consideration or on a higher priority to be widened to four lanes. In 2015, nearly 8 million tons of cargo traveled on it.

According to a Port of Quincy spokesperson, the designation of SR 281 is widely supported by shippers, farmers, processors, organizations and businesses in central Washington.

top

Contact Form Powered By : XYZScripts.com